Blog

PhD Blog #2 Induction Anxiety

Monday was a very busy day. I had my first meeting with my supervisor, and then my induction session at the School of English, followed by the postgraduate drinks reception. The meeting with my supervisor was particularly helpful. I was able to talk about the ways in which my project has already moved away from… Continue reading PhD Blog #2 Induction Anxiety

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Blog

PhD Blog #1: My first visit to the University

Yesterday, Jon and I decided to take a trip to Leeds to scout out the university ahead of my induction next week. When we first arrived, we decided to walk the supposed 27 minutes from the coach station to the university, but after multiple wrong turns and a lot of back tracking it ended up… Continue reading PhD Blog #1: My first visit to the University

Research

The Greening of Postmodern Discourse in Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake and Graham Swift’s Waterland

Originally published in Margaret Atwood Studies, vol 10 (December, 2016). ABSTRACT: In this article, I argue that the groundlessness associated with postmodernism is not as entrenched within its discourse as it may appear. Graham Swift’s Waterland (1992) and Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake (2003), while conforming to many of the aesthetic values of postmodernism, share an… Continue reading The Greening of Postmodern Discourse in Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake and Graham Swift’s Waterland

Research

‘Man is the Measure’: The Individual and the Tribe in Modernist Representations of the Primitive

Published in Postgraduate English, vol. 32 (March, 2016) ABSTRACT This interdisciplinary study investigates the tensions inherent within the ‘anti-modern’ element of early modernism and its relationship to Victorian and fin de siècle narratives of modernity. Using Sigmund Freud’s Totem and Taboo (1913), this essay examines how the primitive is represented in E.M. Forster’s short story ‘The Machine… Continue reading ‘Man is the Measure’: The Individual and the Tribe in Modernist Representations of the Primitive

Research

How E. M. Forster and Igor Stravinsky Thought about the “Primitive”

A version of this post appeared on READ, the blog from Durham University’s English department on 1st July 2016.  In the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, anthropological and ethnographic studies of so-called “primitive cultures” were hugely popular, and there was a surge of interest in and engagement with this emerging discourse across the arts. From Paul… Continue reading How E. M. Forster and Igor Stravinsky Thought about the “Primitive”